Take the Poppy Pledge

COVID-19 will change what we do this ANZAC Day.

But it won't change why we do it.

New social distancing rules mean 2020's Dawn Services are cancelled. Instead, thousands of Australians are going to hold their own - at the end of their driveways.

Take the pledge.

Say you'll join them.

Take the pledge. Say you'll join them.

The Poppy PledgePoppy on a ribbon

This pledge is my promise: I will not forget them.

I will stand at my driveway, at dawn this ANZAC Day, in silence, to honour those who've made the ultimate sacrifice.

We may not be together, but we are united.

And in the morning,
We will remember them.

Take the pledge
Anzac Day - 25 April - Poppy Pledge Anzac Day - 25 April - Poppy Pledge

The Poppy PledgePoppy on a ribbon

This pledge is my promise: I will not forget them.

I will stand at my driveway, at dawn this ANZAC Day, in silence, to honour those who've made the ultimate sacrifice.

We may not be together, but we are united.

And in the morning,
We will remember them.

Take the pledge

people have taken the
Poppy Pledge.

Will you join them too?

Each poppy on the map below represents a household that has taken the pledge.

The 2020 Poppy Pledge has finished!
The 2020 Poppy Pledge has finished!
TAKE THE PLEDGE
TAKE THE PLEDGE

Frequently asked questions


Where did this idea come from?

The Poppy Pledge began as an idea from Justin Wilbur, the son of an American Vietnam War veteran, and Bill Sowry and Terry James, both decorated Australian Army War Veterans.

Justin set up a Facebook group in early March called Aussies & Kiwis for ANZACS to promote his idea and incorporated Bill and Terry's idea also. The group amassed over 197,000 members in its first few weeks.

They are encouraging people to come together on their driveways or balconies at 0555 am for a 0600 minute of silence on Saturday, April 25.

Will I be able to hear The Last Post, or the Ode of Remembrance?

Yes! Anzac Day memorials will be broadcast on radio, online and television. You’re encouraged to tune in on the day. We’ll contact you closer to the date with the relevant details, and include a button here too.

Why hasn’t my poppy appeared?

During periods of high traffic, our servers take a little longer to place your poppy. Check back later today if you can't find your poppy.

When you come back, if your poppy has not appeared, you may need to clear the cache in your browser. Visit www.refreshyourcache.com for instructions on how to do this on your device.

Your poppy will only appear if you enter a full address. Only addresses inside Australia will appear on the map.

Is my information protected?

Don’t worry, we will never share your information with anyone, except for a couple of small pieces on Poppy Pledge map.

Your first name, first letter of your surname and your address (without your street number and street name) will appear if you click on your poppy. That’s it, nothing else will ever be shared.

Why are you asking for my information?

We use your address to place your poppy on the map. We’re asking your email address, so we don’t get the same people putting hundreds of different addresses in.

Aren't poppies only used for Remembrance Day?

It's true that, traditionally, single poppies are not usually worn on ANZAC Day - the single poppy is most closely associated with Remembrance Day. However, wreaths of poppies are traditionally placed at memorials and honour boards on ANZAC Day. And increasingly, poppies are being used in general ANZAC Day observances.

Who’s behind this?

We work for Senator Jacqui Lambie, from Tasmania. She wanted a way to give people a chance to remember those who’ve served our country, even though the current coronavirus/COVID-19 pandemic has forced the RSL to shut down all public events. She was inspired by a social media post encouraging people to do this, and wanted to give it a push along.

I don’t have a driveway, can I still participate?

Absolutely! Plenty of people without a driveway are still pledging to participate. They’re using balconies, they’re going to the roof of their complexes, and some are going right to the street itself. There’s plenty of ways to take part.

TAKE THE PLEDGE

Frequently asked questions


Where did this idea come from?

The Poppy Pledge began as an idea from Justin Wilbur, the son of an American Vietnam War veteran, and Bill Sowry and Terry James, both decorated Australian Army War Veterans.

Justin set up a Facebook group in early March called Aussies & Kiwis for ANZACS to promote his idea and incorporated Bill and Terry's idea also. The group amassed over 197,000 members in its first few weeks.

They are encouraging people to come together on their driveways or balconies at 0555 am for a 0600 minute of silence on Saturday, April 25.

Will I be able to hear The Last Post, or the Ode of Remembrance?

Yes! Anzac Day memorials will be broadcast on radio, online and television. You’re encouraged to tune in on the day. We’ll contact you closer to the date with the relevant details, and include a button here too.

Why hasn’t my poppy appeared?

During periods of high traffic, our servers take a little longer to place your poppy. Check back later today if you can't find your poppy.

When you come back, if your poppy has not appeared, you may need to clear the cache in your browser. Visit www.refreshyourcache.com for instructions on how to do this on your device.

Your poppy will only appear if you enter a full address. Only addresses inside Australia will appear on the map.

Is my information protected?

Don’t worry, we will never share your information with anyone, except for a couple of small pieces on Poppy Pledge map.

Your first name, first letter of your surname and your address (without your street number and street name) will appear if you click on your poppy. That’s it, nothing else will ever be shared.

Why are you asking for my information?

We use your address to place your poppy on the map. We’re asking your email address, so we don’t get the same people putting hundreds of different addresses in.

Aren't poppies only used for Remembrance Day?

It's true that, traditionally, single poppies are not usually worn on ANZAC Day - the single poppy is most closely associated with Remembrance Day. However, wreaths of poppies are traditionally placed at memorials and honour boards on ANZAC Day. And increasingly, poppies are being used in general ANZAC Day observances.

Who’s behind this?

We work for Senator Jacqui Lambie, from Tasmania. She wanted a way to give people a chance to remember those who’ve served our country, even though the current coronavirus/COVID-19 pandemic has forced the RSL to shut down all public events. She was inspired by a social media post encouraging people to do this, and wanted to give it a push along.

I don’t have a driveway, can I still participate?

Absolutely! Plenty of people without a driveway are still pledging to participate. They’re using balconies, they’re going to the roof of their complexes, and some are going right to the street itself. There’s plenty of ways to take part.

TAKE THE PLEDGE